Sample english literature thesis topics

The Southern temperament is (so to speak) more sociable with matter, more gross, impure, indifferent, from relying on its own strength; while that opposed to it, from being less able to react on external applications, is obliged to be more cautious and particular as to the kind of excitement to which it renders itself liable. Starting at dawn as the child Horus, son of the slain and lost Osiris, the orb of light became at midday the mighty Ra, and as evening approached, was transformed into Khep-Ra or Harmachis, again to become Osiris when it had sunk beneath the western verge. Yet there are possibilities for Jonson even now. Much as I honor the advocates of civil-service reform, and applaud what they have accomplished in the way of furthering a real merit system, I submit that a further step in advance may be taken when we have heads of municipal departments as unlikely to make political appointments as the average librarian is, and as free from pressure to make such appointments as are the librarians of a large number of our best institutions. In short, the next time you have an opportunity of surveying those out-of-fashion ornaments, endeavour only to let yourself alone, and to restrain for a few minutes the foolish passion for playing the critic, and you will be sensible that they are not without some degree of beauty; that they give the air of neatness and correct culture at least to the whole garden; and that they are not unlike what the ‘retired leisure, that’ (as Milton says) ‘in trim gardens takes his pleasure,’ might be amused with. Features alone do not run in the blood; vices and virtues, genius and folly are transmitted through the same sure, but unseen channel. For instance, certain sections of the public will not use a library–as they will not use a school–in conjunction with other sections. The seneschal of Anjou and Touraine brought suit before the Parlement of Paris to recover one-third of the amount, as he was entitled to that proportion of all dues arising from combats held within his jurisdiction, and he argued that the liberality of the king was not to be exercised to his disadvantage. Antoine; from twenty sols to fifteen livres, the oath was taken in the cemetery of St. Tarde’s expression, “social group”. Notwithstanding the universality of the custom, and the absolute character of the decisions reached by the process, it is easy to discern that the confidence reposed in it was of a very qualified character, even at an early period. Perhaps nowhere do we find the human mind to have been more strangely misled by the fact of the existence of two words than in this case. Sometimes they would give several words, with their corresponding pictures, for the same sound; just as I have shown was the custom of the ancient Egyptians. Hartshorne must evidently have observed them in a hungry mood. A WAR-SONG OF THE OTOMIS. _No._ 25.—_Admitted_ 1803.—_Aged_ 28. The particulars of this method of burial have often been described, and it is enough that I refer to a few authorities in the note.[79] Indeed it has not been pretended that such mounds necessarily date back to a race anterior to that which occupied the soil at the advent of the white man. This is very plainly seen both in art and language. Some held that he was to be absolved, because torture purged him of all the evidence against him; others argued that he was to be punished with the full penalty of his crime, because the torture was illegal and therefore null and void; others again took a middle course and decided that he was to be visited, not with the penalty of his crime, but with something else, at the discretion of his judge.[1769] According to law, indeed, torture without confession was a full acquittal; but here, again, practice intervened to destroy what little humanity was admitted by jurists, and the accused under such circumstances was still held suspect, and was liable at any moment to be tried again for the same offence.[1770] Indeed, at a comparatively early period after the introduction of torture, we are told that if the accused endured it without confession he was to be kept in prison to see whether new evidence might not turn up: if none came, then the judge was to assign him a reasonable delay for his defence; he was regularly tried, when if convicted he was punished; if not he was discharged.[1771] If, again, a man and woman were tortured on an accusation of adultery committed with each other, and if one confessed while the other did not, both were acquitted according to some authorities, while others held that sample english literature thesis topics the one who confessed should receive some punishment different from that provided for the crime, while the accomplice was to be discharged on taking a purgatorial oath.[1772] Nothing more contradictory and illogical can well be imagined, and, as if to crown the absurdity of the whole, torture after conviction was allowed in order to prevent appeals; and if the unfortunate, at the place of execution, chanced to assert his innocence, he was often hurried from the scaffold to the rack in obedience to the theory that the confession must remain unretracted;[1773] though, if the judge had taken the precaution to have the prisoner’s ratification of his confession duly certified to by a notary and witnesses, this trouble might be avoided, and the culprit be promptly executed in spite of his retraction.[1774] One can scarce repress a grim smile at finding that this series of horrors had pious defenders who urged that a merciful consideration for the offender’s soul required that he should be brought to confess his iniquities in order to secure his eternal salvation.[1775] It was a minor, yet none the less a flagrant injustice, that when a man had endured the torture without confession, and was therefore discharged as innocent, he or his heirs were obliged to defray the whole expenses of his prosecution.[1776] The atrocity of this whole system of so-called criminal justice is forcibly described by the honest indignation of Augustin Nicolas, who, in his judicial capacity under Louis XIV., had ample opportunities of observing its practical working and results. We examine our persons limb by limb, and by placing ourselves before a looking-glass, or by some such expedient, endeavour as much as {101} possible, to view ourselves at the distance and with the eyes of other people. The confusion, however, is in this case more in the word than in the thought; for in reality we still retain some notion of the distinction, though we do not always evolve it with that accuracy which a very slight degree of attention might enable us to do. The little sympathy which we feel with bodily pain, is the foundation of the propriety of constancy and patience in enduring it. Some of these are curious enough. _Ah pu_ is derived both by Ximenez and Brasseur from the prefix _ah_, which is used to signify knowledge or possession of, or control over, mastership or skill in, origin from or practice in that to which it is prefixed; and _ub_, or _pub_, the _sarbacana_ or blowpipe, which these Indians used to employ as a weapon in war and the chase. As a last effort to escape the impending doom, he secretly offered to Bishop Hugh, the Papal legate, the enormous sum of two hundred ounces of gold and other presents in hand, besides equally liberal prospective payments, if he could obtain the privilege of compurgation with six suffragan bishops. {325} Qui nunc te fruitur credulus aurea, Qui semper vacuam, semper amabilem Sperat te; nescius aur? Though none but the weakest and most worthless of mankind are much delighted with false glory, yet, by a strange inconsistency, false ignominy is capable of mortifying those who appear the most resolute and determined. Already it has established for itself a position in the first rank of the sciences which have to do with the highest of problems. (_Doctor Faustus_) and compare the whole set with Spenser again (_F. He has no anxiety to change so comfortable a situation and does not go in quest of new enterprises and adventures, which might endanger, but could not well increase the secure tranquillity which he actually enjoys. [37] See definition in Preface. And the suspicion is in our breast that Mr. But I am willing to leave the case as it stands, and to ask linguists whether, in view of the above, it was not a premature judgment that pronounced it a tongue neither polysynthetic nor incorporative. For such crimes, drowning was the punishment inflicted by the customs of the Franks, as soon as they had lost the respect for individual liberty of action which excluded personal punishments from their original code;[1027] and in addition to the general belief that the pure element refused to receive those who were tainted with crime, there was in this special class of cases a widely spread superstition that adepts in sorcery and magic lost their specific gravity. At this point, at least, he will be alive to the obstinate and inexpugnable reality of our concrete experiences. We found great numbers in these letters, but as they contained nothing that did not savor of superstition and lies of the devil, we burnt them all, at which the natives grieved most keenly and were greatly pained. The sense of power has a sense of pleasure annexed to it, or what is practically tantamount, an impulse, an endeavour, that carries us through the most tiresome drudgery or the hardest tasks. We must have some outstanding object for the mind, as well as the eye, to dwell on and recur to—something marked and decisive to give a tone and texture to the moral feelings. You are members of the best club in St. {447} Thirdly, Those Sensations are incapable of motion. In this connexion the following passage from Moll’s “Hypnotism” is of interest: “The more an action is repulsive to the disposition [of an individual], the stronger is his resistance. In the latter, a single transgression of the rules of temperance and propriety, is commonly more resented, than the constant and avowed contempt of them ever is in the former. In a dull and cloudy atmosphere, I can conceive that this is the identical spot, that the first C?sar trod,—and figure to myself sample english literature thesis topics the deliberate movements and scarce perceptible march of close-embodied legions. More comprehensive was the privilege granted soon afterwards by Henry I. To sum up: the young of the higher apes have something resembling our smile and laugh, and produce the requisite movements when pleased. If my animosity goes beyond what the indignation of my friend can correspond to; if my grief exceeds what his most tender compassion can go along with; if my admiration is either too high or too low to tally with his own; if I laugh loud and heartily when he only smiles, or, on the contrary, only smile when he laughs loud and heartily; in all these cases, as soon as he comes from considering the object, to observe how I am affected by it, according as there is more or less disproportion between his sentiments and mine, I must incur a greater or less degree of his disapprobation: and upon all occasions his own sentiments are the standards and measures by which he judges of mine. A bishop, whose cathedral had suffered largely, sent to the king to request that a certain vase of unusual size and beauty might be restored to him.

Now, I would fain ask whether there is not in this contemplation of the interval that separates the beginning from the end of life, of a life too so varied from good to ill, and of the pitiable termination of which the person speaking has been the wilful and guilty cause, enough to ‘give the mind pause?’ Is not that revelation as it were of the whole extent of our being which is made by the flashes of passion and stroke of calamity, a subject sufficiently staggering to have place in legitimate tragedy? The Algonkin was spoken from Hudson Bay to the Savannah river and from Newfoundland to the Rocky Mountains. Hammond Shandy. Under such circumstances small occurrences, which at other times would pass wholly unmarked, are grasped at and become laughable things for us, just because of the great necessity of man to escape now and again into the freedom of play. The mind is often haunted by painful images and recollections, not that we court their company, but that we cannot shake them off, even though we strive to do it. The soliloquy of the ghost is a characteristic Jonson success in content and in versification— Dost thou not feel me, Rome? Which is the best and which is the cheapest for his purpose? To all of us, so far as we have to live in the world and consort with those who, being both solemn and dull, are likely to take offence, if not with those who, like Mr. What is there to fear? CHAPTER I. 14 and 15, first edit.] {133} Our sensibility to the feelings of others, so far from being inconsistent with the manhood of self-command, is the very principle upon which that manhood is founded. The old college graduate who, having been through four years of Latin, Greek, and mathematics, considered himself able with slight additional training, to undertake to practice law or medicine or manage a parish, was probably too sanguine. As the greater and more irreparable the evil that is done, the resentment of the sufferer runs naturally the higher; so does likewise the sympathetic indignation of the spectator, as well as the sense of guilt in the agent. In neither case, however, is the end regarded as a serious or important one. Burns’s embarrassments, and the temptations to which he was exposed by his situation, degraded him; but left no stigma on his patrons, who still meet to celebrate his memory, and consult about his monument, in the face of day. F. Together they made up his world: literature, politics, riding to hounds. The whole machinery of the library, its buildings, its departments, its regulations, its disciplined staff, are to bring together the reader and the books. For in all other things, what was most perfect, they observed, always came last. Nothing was omitted that would add to the effectiveness of the prolonged ritual, and throughout it was in the hands of the priest; the secular tribunal effaced itself and abandoned the whole conduct of the affair to the Church.[1317] Gradually, however, the papacy ranged itself in opposition to the ordeal. They will naturally, if left to themselves, adjust fares, speed and stops on the former so as to induce a larger proportion of people to travel by the slower surface line, which is less expensive to operate. To begin, it seems fairly certain that the decline of popular mirth is only a part of a larger change, the gradual disappearance of the spirit of play, of a full self-abandonment to the mood of light enjoyment. The Black Dwarf was a paraphrase of the current anecdotes of David Ritchie, without any additional point or interest, and the story of Effie Deans had slept for a century in the law reports and depositions relative to the Heart of Mid-Lothian. The faults and foibles of Matthew Arnold are no less evident to me now than twelve years ago, after my first admiration for him; but I hope that now, on re-reading some of his prose with more care, I can better appreciate his position. Yet the larger part of literature, not being produced for a ruling caste, does not throw much light on this subject.[230] One can only infer with some probability, from the relations of parents and adults, generally, to children, and of white {264} masters to their coloured slaves, that power has always been tempered by some admixture of good-nature, which composition has produced a certain amount of playful jocosity, at once corrective and cementing. If it should be asked then what difference it can make to me whether I pursue my own welfare, or entirely neglect it, what reason I can have to be at all interested in it, I answer that according to the selfish hypothesis I do not see any. If the densities of Jupiter and Saturn were the same with that of the Earth, the periodic times of their several Satellites would be shorter than by observation they are found to be. There seems too to be some natural connection between acuteness in tune and quickness in time or succession, as well as between gravity and slowness: an acute sound seems to fly off more quickly than a grave one: the treble is more cheerful than the bass; its notes likewise commonly succeed one another more rapidly. But we have no such indulgence for the intemperance of joy; because we are not conscious that any such vast effort is requisite to bring it down to what we can entirely enter into. Women, and men of weak nerves, tremble and are overcome with fear, though sensible that themselves are not the objects of the anger. 1 vol. _Edited by his Son._ “A work full of original remarks, and worthy a diligent perusal.” _Bulwer’s England and the English._ London: John Miller, 404 Oxford Street.’ The volume was printed by Walter Spiers, 399 Oxford Street. If it were a common iniquity, if it were slight and partial, or necessary, it would not have this effect; but it very properly carries away the feelings, and (if you will) overpowers the judgment, because it is a mass of evil sample english literature thesis topics so monstrous and unwarranted as not to be endured, even in thought. If, on the other hand, the impulse is less easily accounted for, if, maybe, the message of our souls runs counter to our normal instincts, our interests or reason, we are apt to assume that the impulse emanates from outside our nature and must have, many of us think, a supernatural or Divine origin. Philosophy teaches us, (and by reasons too to which it is scarcely possible to {441} refuse our assent,) that the earth itself, and bodies much larger than the earth, are not only movable, but are at all times actually in motion, and continually altering their situation, in respect to other surrounding bodies, with a rapidity that almost passes all human comprehension. When Sigurd Thorlaksson was accused by Saint Olaf the King of the sample english literature thesis topics murder of his foster-brother Thoralf, and offered to clear himself by the red-hot iron, King Olaf accepted his offer, and appointed the next day for the trial at Lygra, where the bishop was to preside over it. Whether this criticism upon the precise meaning of these words be just, is of little importance. In this educational work he may be, and often is, aided by the teacher, the clergyman, or even by the users of the library themselves. When you take to pieces any verse of Swinburne, you find always that the object was not there—only the word. There had even been a feeling, at some time in the past, on the part of some members of the board, that a graded staff was not a good thing, as it would hamper freedom of control. He is sure that he is unlucky–and sure enough, he is! The reflex or consequent senses, on the other hand, were those faculties from which the mind derived the perception of such species of things as presupposed the antecedent perception of some other. Yet with it all there is not one place where the librarian may look for brief notes on current books, telling him just what he wants to know and no more, and with the confidence that the information is quite free from bias. The measured cadence and regular _sing-song_ of rhyme or blank verse have destroyed, as it were, their natural ear for the mere characteristic harmony which ought to subsist between the sound and the sense. The Kangaroo-rumped fellows. Suppose, for instance, that you are keeping printed material from three clubs in your town, as you ought. We may despise them, but still we read; and nothing that is read with interested attention by fifty millions of people is really despicable.